organized

Outlining and todo lists in Atom (similar to org-mode)

MattFlower

12,807

42

Bug Reports

0.8.1

MIT

GitHub

This package consumes the following services:

What Is Organized?

Organized is designed to allow you to keep notes, a schedule, and todo list inside of Atom.

Organized Screenshot

Right now, we're in the early stages of Organized, but join us now and watch us get better.

Features

How to Use Organized?

Most of the instructions on how to use org-mode consist of two things:

  1. This document - it has descriptions for all the features and a list of keystrokes
  2. Sample files - This will show you how org mode looks in action. See:

I'll eventualy get to writing a proper manual, time permitting

Current Keystrokes

Here are the keystrokes I have mapped as of today:

Keystroke What it does
ctrl-shift-t Toggles a special identifier at the beginning of a line that will mark that line as a TODO. This will make it show up in the sidebar
ctrl-enter If you are on a star line, move to the next line without creating a star
ctrl-i a Remove the current subtree from your file and put it into a file named {current-filename}.org_archive. These files are still in org mode, but aren't indexed so they won't show up in the sidebar.
ctrl-i t Insert the current date/time in ISO-8601 format
ctrl-i / Insert the current date in ISO-8601 format
ctrl-i l Make a link. If there is no selection, we'll insert . If there is a selection, I'll try to intelligently decide whether you are selecting a url or text and put it in the brackets or parentheses as appropriate.
ctrl-i s Add a schedule tag for a star. This defaults to today, there is no mechanism to choose the date other than editing it yourself. If you want to add a time, you can use ISO-8601 time <2016-01-01T14:00:00> or org-mode style time <2016-01-01 Fri 14:00:00>. Either one should work.
ctrl-i v Cycle visibility between only showing the next level stars below the current star, showing the next two levels, or showing everything.
ctrl-shift-i v Cycle global visibility. Like the above except that it applies to everything in the whole file.
ctrl-` x Execute the current code block
alt-shift-up Increase the priority of the current block. A is the highest priority, E is the lowest. This will show up in the todos as some arrows.
alt-shift-down Decrease priority.

What's New?

Please see the CHANGELOG.org for full details of recent changes.

What Do I Want to Build

Learning the Basics of Organized

At the most basic level, Organized is an outlining / note taking tool. You can use either of the two major styles to create an outline:

    * Level 1
      * One way to express index level 2
        * One way to express index level 3

    * Level 1
    ** An alternate way to express index level 2
    *** An alternate way to express index level 3

You can also use alternate characters too. If you use whitespace to establish your indent level, you can mix them:

    - Level 1
      * Level 2
        - Level 3

    - Level 1
    -- Level 2
    --- Level 3

    - Level 1
    -* <=== This is not valid

If you feel like you need to add a TODO, press ctrl-shift-t to do it:

    * [TODO] Some important task

When you are done with your task, press ctrl-shift-t again to mark it as completed.

    * [DONE] Some task I'm done with

If you didn't mean to mark it as a TODO, pressing ctrl-shift-t a final time will make it disappear.

You might want to organize your notes a bit. You can do that with markdown-style headers (a # character, a space, and some text):

    # This is a heading
    * Here are some notes
      * More specific notes

    ## A subheading
    * With some more notes

If you need to write some source code, you can do that too:

    ```java
    public static void main(String[] args) {
      System.out.println("Hello, World");
    }
    ```

Why Did I Write Organized?

I designed Organized in response to a personal itch. I've long been a user of note taking software (plain text, notebooks, Evernote, OneNote, etc) and I've long been a user of todo applications (Outlook, Things, Clear, Todoist).

One day I discovered org-mode, despite the fact I'd been a long-time emacs user. I absolutely loved the concept -- in my mind, todo items should live inside your notes. OneNote almost had this feature, but unfortunately they didn't implement a good way to roll them up in the Mac version. So you've got todos floating around with no good way to coalesce them. (I think this might work if you are using Outlook, but I'm not with you there anymore). I was totally lured in by the ability to both style source code inside your notes AND to actually run them (wow!). Once I found tables that could execute formulas, I know this was a generation beyond what I had been using. (From a mode that has been around forever! nonetheless).

After using org-mode for a few weeks, I found myself craving something more:

I've been told that immitation is flattery. If you have contributed on org-mode and you are fuming at my suggestions, please know I hold you in the highest regard. Really!

Contributions

Contributions of source code or bugs are welcome! Please use Github to submit issues or pull requests.

License

This project has been released under the MIT license. Please see the LICENSE.md file for more details.